Gender differences in intentional social action: We-intention to engage in social network-facilitated team collaboration

Aaron X. Shen, Matthew K. Lee, Christy M K CHEUNG, Huaping Chen

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

    68 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The growth and popularity of Web 2.0 applications help people to build and maintain their social networks online and further encourage social network-facilitated team collaboration. In this study, we conceptualized the use of instant messaging in social network-facilitated team collaboration as an intentional social action and further investigated the effect of gender differences in the development of we-intention (i.e. collective intention) to engage in such collaboration. A research model was developed and empirically tested with 482 university students in Mainland China. The results demonstrated that the effects of attitude, positive anticipated emotions, and group norms on we-intention were more important for men, whereas the effects of social identity and negative anticipated emotions were more significant for women to collectively participate in social network-facilitated team collaboration. We believe the implications of this study would shed considerable light on both research and practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)152-169
    Number of pages18
    JournalJournal of Information Technology
    Volume25
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

    Scopus Subject Areas

    • Information Systems
    • Strategy and Management
    • Library and Information Sciences

    User-Defined Keywords

    • anticipated emotions
    • gender
    • instant messaging
    • social influence
    • social networking
    • we-intention

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