Framing the 2011 Egyptian Revolution Within Ideological Boundaries: One Incident, Three Stories

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The Greater China area provides a unique context for studying news framing. Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, with close geographical and cultural proximity but stark contrast in ideological controls, each represents not free, partly free, and free media system respectively. In reporting the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, news media of these regions constructed the coverage within their own ideology boundaries, especially given their differing stances regarding Beijing’s June 4, 1989 Crackdown of student demonstrations, resulting in differing news stories about the same event. This study compared newspaper coverage of the three regions on the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Framing analysis was conducted in terms of news selection, sourcing pattern, favorability toward the protestors or the Egyptian government, and overall news perspective. Results show significant differences in coverage between contrasting media systems (Mainland China vs Hong Kong & Taiwan). The frames employed in the coverage were interpreted and discussed in the context of ideological difference and press freedom variation. Reasons for these differences and theoretical implications were explored.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 25 May 2012
EventICA 2012 - 62nd Annual International Communication Association Conference: Communication and Community - Phoenix, United States
Duration: 24 May 201228 May 2012

Conference

ConferenceICA 2012 - 62nd Annual International Communication Association Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhoenix
Period24/05/1228/05/12

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