Finding type and location of the source of cardiac arrhythmias from the averaged flow velocity field using the determinant-trace method

Qi Hao Li, Enid Van Nieuwenhuyse, Yuan Xun Xia, Jun Ting Pan, Mattias Duytschaever, Sebastien Knecht, Nele Vandersickel, Changsong Zhou, Alexander V. Panfilov*, Hong Zhang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Life threatening cardiac arrhythmias result from abnormal propagation of nonlinear electrical excitation waves in the heart. Finding the locations of the sources of these waves remains a challenging problem. This is mainly due to the low spatial resolution of electrode recordings of these waves. Also, these recordings are subjected to noise. In this paper, we develop a different approach: the AFV-DT method based on an averaged flow velocity (AFV) technique adopted from the analysis of optical flows and the determinant-trace (DT) method used for vector field analysis of dynamical systems. This method can find the location and determine all important types of sources found in excitable media such as focal activity, spiral waves, and waves rotating around obstacles. We test this method on in silico data of various wave excitation patterns obtained using the Luo-Rudy model for cardiac tissue. We show that the method works well for data with low spatial resolutions (up to 8×8) and is stable against noise. Finally, we apply it to two clinical cases and show that it can correctly identify the arrhythmia type and location. We discuss further steps on the development and improvement of this approach.

Original languageEnglish
Article number064401
Number of pages10
JournalPhysical Review E
Volume104
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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