Face, fate and brand equity: service recovery justice and satisfaction

Joseph Lok Man Lee*, Noel Y M SIU, Junfeng ZHANG

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Can we always expect that service recovery justice leads to satisfaction? Literature has shown that a number of moderating factors impact the recovery justice-satisfaction link in different cultures. However, there is a dearth of research that has indicated the key cultural variables that play a moderating role. This study aims to attempt to fill the research gap by investigating the moderating role of concern for face, belief in fate and brand equity in the relationship between perceived justice and satisfaction in Chinese culture during service recovery. Design/methodology/approach: The hypothesized relationships are tested using data from interviews with 600 persons who have recently complained about their telecommunications services. Structural equation modeling is applied in analyzing their responses. Findings: Concern for face is found to strengthen the relationship between interactional justice perceptions and satisfaction, but to weaken the relationship between distributive justice perceptions and satisfaction. Belief in fate weakens the link between perceptions of interactional justice and satisfaction. Brand equity positively moderates the relationship between perceptions of interactional justice and satisfaction, but it negatively moderates the relationship between perceptions of distributive justice and satisfaction. Practical implications: The cultural variables, namely, face, fate and brand equity, are found to serve as a moderating role in the relationship between recovery justice dimensions and satisfaction. They are more salient when it is related to social element. Face and brand equity, as interpersonal constructs, aggravate the impact of interactional justice on satisfaction. Fate, as non-social factor, weakens the impact of interactional justice on satisfaction. It is argued that managers should provide staff training in product knowledge and customer service as a preventive measure against damage to the brand. Regular customer satisfaction research and benchmarking exercises should be conducted to understand how customers perceive interactional justice. Originality/value: This has been the first research to examine the impact of concern for face, belief in fate and brand equity in the relationship between justice perceptions and post-recovery satisfaction during service recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)843-854
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consumer Marketing
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2020

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Marketing

User-Defined Keywords

  • Brand equity
  • Face
  • Fate
  • Justice perceptions
  • Post-recovery satisfaction
  • Telecommunications services

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