Extending the Gamson hypothesis on social media use and elite-challenging political participation: A cross-polity study

Xinzhi Zhang, Wan Ying Lin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the conditional effects of new media use on elite-challenging political engagement such as demonstrations and protests. Applying the Gamson Hypothesis, which states that a combination of high internal political efficacy and low political trust is the optimum condition for political mobilization, and extending the differential political implications of new media, this study illustrates how internet use and two types of social media use, i.e., capital-enhancing use and recreational use, and the trust-efficacy typologies jointly affect political participation, with empirical reference to three Asian polities, i.e., mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Results from two comparative surveys echoed previous literature that capital-enhancing social media use always facilitated political engagement whereas recreational use might reduce engagement. Supporting the Gamson Hypothesis, Dissidents, who had high internal efficacy but low political trust, were more politically active; and for these Dissidents, the capital-enhancing social media use casted a stronger political impact.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2017
EventICA 2017 - 67th Annual International Communication Association Conference: Interventions. Communication Research and Practice - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: 25 May 201729 May 2017
https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ica/ica17/

Conference

ConferenceICA 2017 - 67th Annual International Communication Association Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period25/05/1729/05/17
Internet address

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