Exerting Soft Power in Asia: Public Perceptions of the EU in Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea and Thailand

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Abstract

Europe's ability to project power depends on a unique combination of normative influence with a specific mix of policy instruments that help to increase its political and economic influence all around the world. For the purpose of this analysis, the images of the EU, the perceived importance of the EU, and the perceived state of relationship with the EU are subject to empirical examination. The soft power approach to international relations is found to be inadequate in dealing with longdrawn- out security issues which persist in Asia or in promoting European values in the Far East. Europeans are found in a weaker position when compared to their American and Chinese counterparts. Back in Europe, the Treaty of Lisbon now promises a more visible and coherent political profile in consistent with the EU's better-known economic profile.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-26
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Comparative Politics
Volume2
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

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