Examining the roles of fatalism, stigma, and risk perception on cancer information seeking and avoidance among Chinese adults in Hong Kong

Edmund W. J. Lee, Jingyuan Shi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To examine how cancer fatalism, stigma, and risk perception influence information seeking and avoidance among Chinese adults in Hong Kong.

Methods: We administered an online survey to 616 Hong Kong Chinese adults using quota sampling and analyzed the data using structural equation modeling.

Results: Fatalism was positively associated with susceptibility (β =.25, p <.001), severity (β =.11, p =.03), and fear (β =.17, p <.001), while stigma was negatively associated with severity (β = −.22, p <.001). Severity (β = −.19, p <.001) was negatively associated but fear was positively associated with cancer information avoidance (β =.14, p =.01). Implications for Psychosocial Providers or Policy: Public health communication and education on cancer risks among ethnic Chinese communities in Hong Kong should be sensitive and address underlying cultural beliefs and views that may impede active information seeking.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Aug 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Oncology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

User-Defined Keywords

  • cancer information avoidance
  • cancer information seeking
  • cultural views on cancer
  • family history of cancer
  • risk perception

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