Egalitarian sexism: A kantian framework for assessing the cultural evolution of marriage (I)

Stephen R PALMQUIST*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    36 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This first part of a two-part series exploring implications of the natural differences between the sexes for the cultural evolution of marriage assesses whether Kant should be condemned as a sexist due to his various offensive claims about women. Being antithetical to modern-day assumptions regarding the equality of the sexes, Kant's views seem to contradict his own egalitarian ethics. A philosophical framework for making crosscultural ethical assessments requires one to assess those in other cultures by their own ethical standards. Sexism is inappropriate if it exhibits or reinforces a tendency to dominate the opposite sex. Kant's theory of marriage, by contrast, illustrates how sexism can be egalitarian: given the natural differences between the sexes, different roles and cultural norms help to ensure that females and males are equal. Judged by the standards of his own day and in the context of his philosophical system, Kant's sexism is not ethically inappropriate.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)35-55
    Number of pages21
    JournalEthics and Bioethics (in Central Europe)
    Volume7
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

    Scopus Subject Areas

    • Education
    • Philosophy
    • Health Policy

    User-Defined Keywords

    • Cross-cultural assessments
    • Cultural evolution
    • Egalitarian Ethics
    • Immanuel Kant
    • Marriage
    • Nature of the sexes
    • Sexism

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