Does Where You Live Matter? An Analysis of Intergenerational Transmission of Education Among Hispanic Americans

Sharron Xuanren Wang*, Arthur Sakamoto

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The intergenerational transmission of education from parents to children is an important indicator of societal inclusiveness and educational inequality. The present study uses restricted-access data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to investigate whether intergenerational educational transmission varies by county-level demographic and socioeconomic characteristics for Hispanic Americans. Based on parental birthplace, Hispanic Americans are grouped into 3 + generation (i.e., children of native-born Hispanic parents) and 2nd generation (i.e., children of foreign-born Hispanic parents). Men and women are analyzed separately. The results indicate that intergenerational educational mobility is higher if 3 + generation Hispanic men reside in areas with a larger Hispanic population, and if 2nd generation Hispanic men reside in areas with a larger college-educated population, during their adolescent years. County-level socioeconomic characteristics do not seem to affect intergenerational educational mobility of Hispanic women, non-Hispanic white men, or non-Hispanic white women. Theoretical and empirical implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number657980
Number of pages13
JournalFrontiers in Sociology
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Aug 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • county-level characteristics
  • Hispanic Americans
  • immigration
  • intergenerational educational mobility
  • NLSY97

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