Discerning the Worldview in Confucian Proverbs: A Preliminary Reflection on S. C. Malan's Selection of Confucian Proverbs from The Four Books

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Abstract

Confucianism has very often been taken as a representative school of humanism, yet humanism is a complex concept with many layers of accumulated meaning.1 While some do argue that humanism is essentially atheistic (or agnostic), particularly among some modern humanists, there are also those who recognize that there are other forms of humanism that have existed in different periods and cultures, and so they conceive of the fact and further possibilities of identifying and developing a religious form of humanism. Nevertheless, Confucian humanism, especially in its modern expressions, has very often been understood as a kind of secular thought deprived of any religious dimension. Consequently, some scholars persist in claiming that even classical Confucian works are books that essentially express a form of secular wisdom.


Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPolyglot from the Far Side of the Moon
Subtitle of host publicationThe Life and Works of Solomon Caesar Malan (1812–1894)
EditorsLauren F. Pfister
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter7
Pages123-150
Number of pages28
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781003230434
ISBN (Print)9781032136639
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2022

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