Decision-making of mothers in Hong Kong regarding the occasional use of alternative child-care arrangements

Vicky C W TAM*, Kathryn D. Rettig

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the use of alternative child-care arrangements as an everyday life decision in a family context. Interviews with twenty-four mothers from a working class neighborhood in a new town in Hong Kong were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results of the analysis outlined: (a) the structural components of making a decision regarding alternative care, which consisted of demands, resource options, definitions of the situation, types of decision situations, and the respective decision-making strategies; and (b) the nature of decision-making processes, varying from ad hoc to standing. Together, these aspects illuminate how mothers make decisions regarding the use of alternative child-care arrangements and, in turn, the characteristics of family decision-making in everyday life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-190
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Family and Economic Issues
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics

User-Defined Keywords

  • Alternative child care
  • Decision-making
  • Grounded theory
  • Hong Kong

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