Culture, music education and the state in Hong Kong and Taiwan in a global age

Wing Wah Law*, Wai Chung HO

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the implications of the processes of globalization, localization, and Sinophilia for school music education, with a focus on Hong Kong and Taiwan. Hong Kong and Taiwanese students are expected to become multicultural with respect to Western classical music, traditional Chinese music, other forms of world music, and their local classical and folk music. This study's findings, however, suggest that the processes of globalization, localization, and Sinophilia are unequal determinants of the cultural transformation of Hong Kong and Taiwanese music education. The survey, which was completed by 1,750 Hong Kong and 1,674 Taiwanese secondary school students between March and May 2004, shows that students from both communities much prefer Western classical and popular musics to their respective local folk music, local classical music, and traditional Chinese styles. This paper argues that globalization operates as a homogenizing force in transmitting Western classical music and popular music in schools. Nonetheless, using globalization and localization together, we can stimulate the values of pluralism and emphasize cultural diversity through school music education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-77
Number of pages15
JournalBulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education
Issue number169
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Education
  • Music

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