Cost-effective circadian mechanism: rhythmic degradation of circadian proteins spontaneously emerges without rhythmic post-translational regulation

Roktaek Lim, Junghun Chae, David E. Somers, Cheol Min Ghim*, Pan Jun Kim*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Circadian protein oscillations are maintained by the lifelong repetition of protein production and degradation in daily balance. It comes at the cost of ever-replayed, futile protein synthesis each day. This biosynthetic cost with a given oscillatory protein profile is relievable by a rhythmic, not constant, degradation rate that selectively peaks at the right time of day but remains low elsewhere, saving much of the gross protein loss and of the replenishing protein synthesis. Here, our mathematical modeling reveals that the rhythmic degradation rate of proteins with circadian production spontaneously emerges under steady and limited activity of proteolytic mediators and does not necessarily require rhythmic post-translational regulation of previous focus. Additional (yet steady) post-translational modifications in a proteolytic pathway can further facilitate the degradation's rhythmicity in favor of the biosynthetic cost saving. Our work is supported by animal and plant circadian data, offering a generic mechanism for potentially widespread, time-dependent protein turnover.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102726
Number of pages30
JournaliScience
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jul 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • General

User-Defined Keywords

  • In silico biology
  • Mathematical biosciences
  • Systems biology

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