Consumers' willingness to buy products with environmental and ethical claims: The roles of social representations and social identity

Jos Bartels, Marleen C. Onwezen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigates how social representations and consumers' identification with organic food consumers affects intentions to buy products that make environmental and ethical claims. For the purposes of the study, an online panel study was conducted on a representative sample of consumers (n = 1006) in the United Kingdom. The results demonstrate that consumers who are adherent to natural foods or technology and do not perceive food as a necessity are more willing to buy environmentally friendly and ethical products. There seems to be no relationship between perceptions of food as a source of enjoyment and intentions to buy sustainable products. Finally, social identification with the organic consumer is positively related with the intentions to buy products that make environmental and ethical claims. The current research demonstrates that both individual perceptions of food and consumers' perceptions of the social environment play an important role in promoting environmentally friendly and ethical behaviour.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-89
JournalInternational Journal of Consumer Studies
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

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