Chinese children's perception of personal and commercial communication: An urban–rural comparison

Kara K W CHAN*, James U. McNeal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines how urban and rural children in Mainland China learn about new products and services, and their attitudes toward different communication channels for market and product information. A survey of 1,977 children aged six to 13 in four Chinese urban cities and four rural provinces was conducted in March 2003 to May 2004. Results indicated that there are significant differences in perception of personal and commercial communication sources among urban and rural children. As predicted by Rogers’ and Schramm's theories, urban children found commercial sources more useful and credible than rural children in obtaining information about new products and services. Rural children perceived personal sources more useful and credible than urban children. John's theory of consumer socialization was supported. Older children found parents and grandparents less useful and less credible than younger children. Older children also found commercial sources more useful and credible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-116
Number of pages20
JournalAsian Journal of Communication
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Communication
  • Education

User-Defined Keywords

  • China
  • Communication Theory
  • Consumer Socialization
  • Urban–Rural

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