Calligraphic Materiality and Multimodality-- Modes of Expression and Representation in Calligraphy Tapestry: As the deer pants for streams of water I lift up my eyes to the mountains

Chak Kwong LAU* (Art Historian)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Non-textual formArtefact

11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This work was produced and exhibited in conjunction with a refereed conference paper, titled “Modes of Expression and Representation in Chinese Calligraphy: Calligraphic Works as Aesthetic-object-cum-public-message and their Dynamics with Contexts of Use in the City of Hong Kong” (General Research Fund/ GRF) from the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong (Project Number: 12600521/ Project title: Calligraphic Materiality and Multimodality: Modes of Expression and Representation in Chinese Calligraphy and their Dynamics with Contexts of Use in the City of Hong Kong ) with this abstract: “Little research has been conducted on Hong Kong calligraphy. Previous works have largely treated calligraphy as a form of high art, produced and appreciated by only a small community of literati. As a result, it has been generally assumed that calligraphic art is of little importance except to a restricted circle of specialists. To compensate for this neglect of calligraphy’s wider significance, this paper examines calligraphic works in public venues around Hong Kong and alternative modes of expression with their contexts of use in the city. In the field of art history, conventional methodology of stylistic analysis is commonly adopted for research on Chinese calligraphy. In contrast, this paper’s new research methodology is inspired by the parameters of “geosemiotics” that eventually offers a more encompassing approach for examining and interpreting the relationships and synergistic effects of the following factors: 1) calligraphic aesthetics and style as semiotic resources for meaning making; 2) calligraphic expressions manifested in a wide range of material forms in physical and cyber spaces; 3) alternative modes of calligraphic expression; and 4) calligraphy’s social and cultural contexts and contexts of use in Hong Kong. Scrutinizing calligraphy as a form of aesthetic-object-cum-public-message that connotes more profound meanings pertinent to the city and city life, the new methodology thereby illuminates how calligraphy has been transformed from a literati-oriented, rarefied form of art with a restricted audience into a more accessible form of visual culture that reaches wider audiences, thus shedding light on what has shaped Hongkonger’s thoughts, values and identity.”

The work-Calligraphy Tapestry has been exhibited at Stelux House, Hong Kong, April-July 2023
Original languageEnglish
Media of outputOther
SizeCalligraphy Tapestry 427cm x 561 cm
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • Chinese calligraphy tapestry
  • public space
  • The city of Hong Kong

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Calligraphic Materiality and Multimodality-- Modes of Expression and Representation in Calligraphy Tapestry: As the deer pants for streams of water I lift up my eyes to the mountains'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this