Bisphenol a analogues suppress spheroid attachment on human endometrial epithelial cells through modulation of steroid hormone receptors signaling pathway

Hongjie Fan, Sudini R. Fernando, Luhan Jiang, Ziyi Wang, Suranga P. Kodithuwakku, Chris K. C. Wong, Ernest H. Y. Ng, William S. B. Yeung, Kai Fai Lee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known endocrine disruptor, widely used in various consumer products and ubiquitously found in air, water, food, dust, and sewage leachates. Recently, several countries have restricted the use of BPA and replaced them with bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF), which have a similar chemical structure to BPA. Compared to BPA, both BPS and BPF have weaker estrogenic effects, but their effects on human reproductive function including endometrial receptivity and embryo implantation still remain largely unknown. We used an in vitro spheroid (blastocyst surrogate) co-culture assay to investigate the effects of BPA, BPS, and BPF on spheroid attachment on human endometrial epithelial cells, and further delineated their role on steroid hormone receptor expression. We also used transcriptomics to investigate the effects of BPA, BPS, and BPF on the transcriptome of human endometrial cells. We found that bisphenol treatment in human endometrial Ishikawa cells altered estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling and upregulated progesterone receptors (PR). Bisphenols suppressed spheroid attachment onto Ishikawa cells, which was reversed by the downregulation of PR through PR siRNA. Overall, we found that bisphenol compounds can affect human endometrial epithelial cell receptivity through the modulation of steroid hormone receptor function leading to impaired embryo implantation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2882
JournalCells
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Medicine(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • Bisphenols
  • Co-culture
  • Endometrium
  • Microarray
  • Spheroid attachment
  • Steroid hormones

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Bisphenol a analogues suppress spheroid attachment on human endometrial epithelial cells through modulation of steroid hormone receptors signaling pathway'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this