Appraising performance across borders: An empirical examination of the purposes and practices of performance appraisal in a multi-country context

Flora CHIANG, Thomas A. Birtch*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study empirically investigated culture's consequences on the major purposes and practices of performance appraisal using a sample (n = 1749) drawn from the banking industry in seven countries across Europe, Asia, and North America. We found that the effects and predictive capability of assertiveness, uncertainty avoidance, in-group collectivism, and power distance should not be overstated nor are they straightforward. Organizations must be cognizant of the potential influence that a range of other organizational, institutional, and economic factors may wield on appraisal. These findings hold significant implications for the theoretical underpinnings of appraisal, a management tool largely rooted in US equity, expectancy, and procedural justice values and traditions. They also offer important lessons for practice. Not only is the transferability of appraisal and its operationalization affected by interactions with divergent cultures and contextual settings, but new hybrid appraisal architectures are emerging that necessitate further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1365-1393
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Management Studies
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Appraising performance across borders: An empirical examination of the purposes and practices of performance appraisal in a multi-country context'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this