Antioxidant responses and lipid peroxidation in gills and hepatopancreas of the mussel Perna viridis upon exposure to the red-tide organism Chattonella marina and hydrogen peroxide

Chung Ting Kwok, Jason P. van de Merwe, Jill M.Y. Chiu, Rudolf S.S. Wu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the red-tide organism Chattonella marina. Subsequently, we examined the antioxidant responses as well as lipid peroxidation in gills and hepatopancreas of the mussel Perna viridis upon exposure to C. marina at environmentally realistic concentrations (103 and 104 cells ml−1). Despite the extracellular levels of H2O2 generated were up to ∼0.5 (at 103 cells ml−1) and 20 μM (at 104 cells ml−1), no significant differences could be observed in any of the examined biochemical parameters (i.e. catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR) and lipid peroxidation (LPO)) in mussels between treatment and control groups. In another experiment, where mussels were exposed to H2O2, no responses were induced at the concentration up to 0.5 mM. These data collectively indicate that the production of H2O2 by C. marina is not high enough to elicit antioxidant responses in mussels. As such, reactive oxygen species (ROS) is unlikely to be an important toxicological mechanism of C. marina.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-46
Number of pages7
JournalHarmful Algae
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Plant Science

User-Defined Keywords

  • Bivalves
  • Harmful algal blooms
  • Marine invertebrates
  • Raphidophyceae
  • Reactive oxygen species

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