Acute performance responses to repeated treadmill sprints in hypoxia with varying inspired oxygen fractions, exercise-to-recovery ratios and recovery modalities

Tomas K. Tong*, Emma D. Tao, Bik C. Chow, Julien BAKER, Jojo J. Jiao

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: For optimizing the quality of repeated-sprint training in hypoxia, the differences in the acute performance responses to a single session of repeated-sprint exercise with various (i) inspired oxygen fractions; (ii) exercise-to-recovery (E:R) ratios and (iii) recovery modalities were examined. Methods: Ten male participants performed three sets, 5 × 5-s all-out treadmill sprints, E:R ratio of 1:5, passive recovery, in seven trials randomly. In four of the seven trials, hypoxic levels were set corresponding to sea level (SL1:5P), 1500 (1.5K1:5P), 2500 (2.5K1:5P), and 3500 m (3.5K1:5P), respectively. In a further two trials, the hypoxic level of 3.5K1:5P was maintained, while the E:R ratio was reduced to 1:4 (3.5K1:4P) and 1:3 (3.5K1:3P), respectively. In the last trial, the passive recovery mode of 3.5K1:5P was changed to active (3.5K1:5A). Results: In comparison to SL1:5P, the averaged peak velocity (P-Vel), mean velocity (M-Vel), and velocity decrement score (Sdec) of the sprints, and the cumulative HR-based training impulse (cTRIMP) in 1.5K1:5P and 2.5K1:5P were well maintained. Minor decrement in the M-Vel was found in 3.5K1:5P. Conversely, lowered E:R ratio in 3.5K1:4P and 3.5K1:3P significantly reduced the P-Vel (≥ −2.3%, Cohen’s d ≥ 0.43) and M-Vel (≥ −2.4%, ≥ 0.49), and in 3.5K1:3P altered the Sdec (107%, ≥ 0.96), and cTRIMP (−16%, 1.39), when compared to 3.5K1:5P. Furthermore, mild reductions in M-Vel (−2.6%, 0.5) was observed in 3.5K1:5A using the active recovery mode. Other variables did not change. Conclusion: The findings suggest that a 3.5K1:5P marginally maintained sea-level training loads, and as a result, could maximally optimize the training stress of hypoxia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1933-1942
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume121
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

User-Defined Keywords

  • Intermittent hypoxic training
  • Repeated-sprint training in hypoxia
  • Team sports
  • Training load

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