Active and Passive Facebook Use and Associated Costly Off-line Helping Behavior

Yu Leung NG*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined active and passive Facebook use and the associated costly altruistic behavior. Results supported the hypothesis that social media use, particularly active use, can enhance the perceived relatedness of individuals in need and reduce the influence of genetic relatedness in helping. Passive social media users tended to help kin in both situations involving low and high biological cost, whereas they were less likely to risk themselves to help social media friends and strangers in extraordinary situations involving high biological cost. However, active social media users, who had a broader sense of connectedness with genetically unrelated individuals, were more willing to help social media friends and strangers in both situations involving high and low biological cost.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2562-2581
Number of pages20
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2020

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Psychology(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • Inclusive fitness
  • off-line helping
  • reciprocal altruism
  • social capital
  • social media

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