A role for CHH methylation in the parent-of-origin effect on altered circadian rhythms and biomass Heterosis in Arabidopsis intraspecific hybrids

Danny W K NG, Marisa Miller, Helen H. Yu, Tien Yu Huan, Eun Deok Kim, Jie Lu, Qiguang Xie, C. Robertson McClung, Z. Jeffrey Chen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hybrid plants and animals often show increased levels of growth and fitness, a phenomenon known as hybrid vigor or heterosis. Circadian rhythms optimize physiology and metabolism in plants and animals. In plant hybrids and polyploids, expression changes of the genes within the circadian regulatory network, such asCIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1), lead to heterosis. However, the relationship between allelic CCA1 expression and heterosis has remained elusive. Here, we show a parent-of-origin effect on altered circadian rhythms and heterosis inArabidopsis thaliana F1 hybrids. This parent-of-origin effect on biomass heterosis correlates with altered CCA1 expression amplitudes, which are associated with methylation levels of CHH (where H = A, T, or C) sites in the promoter region. The direction of rhythmic expression and hybrid vigor is reversed in reciprocal F1 crosses involving mutants that are defective in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway (argonaute4 and nuclear RNA polymerase D1a) but not in the maintenance methylation pathway (methyltransferase1 and decrease in DNA methylation1). This parent-of-origin effect on circadian regulation and heterosis is established during early embryogenesis and maintained throughout growth and development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2430-2440
Number of pages11
JournalPlant Cell
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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