A Quasi-Experimental Study on the Effect of an Outdoor Physical Activity Program on the Well-Being of Older Chinese People in Hong Kong

Daniel W L Lai*, Xiaoting Ou, Jiahui Jin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Active participation in physical activity by older people is effective in improving their health. This research aims to examine the positive effects of participation in vigorous outdoor physical activities by older Chinese people in Hong Kong, and whether such effects would vary with socioeconomic background. A quasi-experimental, nonequivalent group design was used. A total of 22 participants were randomly assigned to participate in an outdoor physical activity program. Another 14 participants took part as a control group. The 14-item Self-Image of Aging Scale for Chinese Elders and the four-item self-report Subjective Happiness Scale were used to measure participants' self-image and overall happiness level. All participants completed the assessment before and after the program. Happiness level was enhanced in participants in the experimental group ( p = 0.037) and their level of overall mental health also improved ( p = 0.031, η 2 p = 0.129). Demographics did not have any significant effect on well-being outcomes. A structured outdoor physical activity program could be a viable choice for future practice to enhance the mental well-being of older Chinese people.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8950
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2022

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

User-Defined Keywords

  • mental health
  • physical activity
  • happiness
  • Chinese
  • older people
  • quasi-experiment

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