A Modern Chinese Philosophy Built upon Critically Received Traditions: Feng Youlan’s New Principle-Centered Learning and the Question of Its Relationship to Contemporary New Ruist (“Confucian”) Philosophies

Lauren F Pfister*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in book/report/conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In his recent book on “new traditionalism” (xin chuantongzhuyi 新傳統主義) Zheng Jiadong 鄭家棟 refers to Feng Youlan 馮友蘭 (1895–1990) as part of a broader movement to reinstate selective traditional concepts within the framework of a distinctively modern style of Chinese philosophizing. Much to his credit, Zheng handles the varying philosophical concerns of Feng’s controversial career before and after the establishment of the People’s Republic in China in 1949 with considerable objectivity, recognizing that Feng’s writings display some very new interests after that watershed event. In addition, he notes Feng’s consistent concern to build an interpretative bridge—or perhaps it is better to speak of him building several different bridges at various times during his long career—between the traditional concepts he coined as early as 1931 as “Chinese philosophical” ideas, and the modern “Western” and later explicitly “Marxist” philosophical concepts to which he regularly compared them.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Confucianism
Subtitle of host publicationA Critical Examination
EditorsJohn Makeham
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter6
Pages165-184
Number of pages20
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781403982414
ISBN (Print)9781403961402, 9781349526529, 9780230258143
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

User-Defined Keywords

  • Chinese Philosophy
  • Philosophical System
  • Chinese Intellectual
  • Philosophical Claim
  • Philosophical Orientation

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