A cross-cultural comparison of teachers' expressed beliefs about music education and their observed practices in classroom music teaching

Marina W Y WONG*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Through interviews and observing day-to-day classroom practice, this study explores the beliefs of 10 music teachers in elementary schools in Vancouver and Hong Kong. The results demonstrate that the music teachers of the two localities hold similar cognitive beliefs about the essential elements of music education. However, they hold different beliefs about the value or impact of music education on the psychological or character development of students. Music teachers of Vancouver are found to be more student-centred than their counterparts in Hong Kong, and this is reflected in both the curriculum and activities selected for classroom teaching. Though both groups of teachers place similar emphasis on western music, in Canada more classroom activities are based around the student's personal enjoyment and expression. In Hong Kong, meanwhile, music education is viewed as a means of nurturing the student's temperamental development. While students in Vancouver are allowed to express their personal musical preferences in classroom activities, in Hong Kong students are required to perform according to prescribed standard indicators of success. This is probably linkedalbeit invisiblyto Chinese Confucian culture.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)397-418
    Number of pages22
    JournalTeachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice
    Volume11
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Scopus Subject Areas

    • Education
    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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