A 3D DLM/FD method for simulating the motion of spheres and ellipsoids under creeping flow conditions

Tsorng Whay Pan*, Aixia Guo, Shang Huan Chiu, Roland GLOWINSKI

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present in this article a novel distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain (DLM/FD) method for simulating fluid-particle interaction in three-dimensional (3D) Stokes flow. The methodology is validated by comparing the numerical results for a neutrally buoyant particle, of either spherical or prolate shape, with the associated Jeffrey's solutions for a simple shear flow. The results concerning two balls, interacting under creeping flow conditions in a bounded shear flow, are consistent with those available in the literature. We will discuss also the interactions of two balls in a bounded shear flow, when these balls are very close initially. For a prolate ellipsoid rotating in a shear flow under the sole effect of the particle inertia, shear plane tumbling is stable, while log-rolling is unstable. For two prolate ellipsoids interacting in a bounded shear flow, the results are similar to those for two balls if the major axes are initially orthogonal to the shear plane (a result not at all surprising considering that the intersections of the ellipsoids with the shear pane are circular).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-425
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Computational Physics
Volume352
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Scopus Subject Areas

  • Numerical Analysis
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

User-Defined Keywords

  • Distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain methods
  • Neutrally buoyant particles
  • Particle suspension
  • Shear flow
  • Stokes flow

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